SURGE CABARET CLUB

SURGE Cabaret Club

SURGE 2012:

SURGE Cabaret Club

Fri 27 - Sun 29 Jul 2012 | Performances: 8.30pm-11pm // Club: 11pm-late | £5

Our attentive waiters will be awaiting your signal… Grab a cocktail and browse our menu of 10-minute intimate performances, sample treats ranging from the wildly humorous to the seductively dark and enjoy an experience which promises to be fantastical, edgy and always surprising. Watch just one or all twelve of the performances on offer – the choice is yours, and the bar is always open! Our intimate performances have been mixed, strained and poured by the following means…

My Hands are Dancing but my Heart is Cold

Ian Smith of Mischief La-Bas presents My Hands are Dancing but my Heart is Cold. Ever put a brave face on it? Ever questioned why the show must go on? Well, you’re not the only one. It could have been so different. But it’s too late now. Spend a few minutes with an old trouper, a safe pair of hands, a secret love and a tiny theatre.

Alasdair Satchel: Tréteau Theatre

As part of the SURGE Cabaret Club, Scottish actor and director Alasdair Satchel develops work conducted during his Pitch masterclasses and presents an epic and intimate work of Tréteau Theatre, placing seven actors on a 2×1 metre stage and inviting them to tell the biggest stories they possibly can…

Angie Dight: Three Feet Left

Incorporating dance, movement and street theatre, Three Feet Left is accessible, interactive and fun. Appearing unannounced, and as if from nowhere, the piece plays on the interaction between the performers demonstrating their differences but exploring possible connections through the language of dance. Dance that is not solely about technique but about the joy of movement that can be shared and enjoyed by all.
Performed and choreograped by Jim Callaghan, Angie Dight, Paul Henry and Adura Onashile. Devised and directed by Angie Dight. Made with support from Dance House and Mischief La-Bas.

Alex Rigg: Marquis de Sade

Maitre D’ of the SURGE Cabaret Club is special guest the Marquis de Sade, still in full creative flow, working on his latest dramatisation. Beware – you may find yourself a pawn (or prawn) in his latest game of dangerous ideals…

Conflux International Residency Programme

Conflux has matched up seven emergent artists from across Europe with seven international mentors. They have been working throughout the year to develop the backbone of the SURGE Cabaret Club – seven new works of intimate theatre involving everything from sleight of hand magic tricks to blindfolded binaural adventures…

The artists are: Julie Langford (England / USA), Sanna Blennow (Denmark), Emma Brierley (Scotland), Tea Vidmar (Slovenia), Balázs Gyertyán (Hungary), Calum MacAskill (Scotland) and Rodrigo Malvar (Portugal).

The mentors are: Alberto Santos (The Basque Country), Guy Veale (Scotland), Ewan Hunter (Scotland), Ian Smith (Scotland), Hilary Westlake (England), Nullo Facchini (Denmark) and Elinor Randle (England).

Olivier De Sagazan residency

Alongside presenting his two shows Transfiguration and Hybridation, Olivier will also be holding a residency involving six Scottish-based artists to create three short works to be presented as part of the SURGE Cabaret Club. Taking place in the eerie derelict spaces of the Arches, the residency will explore themes of deformity and transformation, and the unlocking of creative processes that occurs when one is submerged in earth…

Physical Theatre Summer School (led by Elinor Randle of Tmesis Theatre)

A week long course focusing on physical theatre techniques with the participants performing the results in their role as hosts of the SURGE Cabaret Club. The project will include daily physical training to improve strength, flexibility, body awareness and creativity. Participants will work on physical devising techniques and improvisation to create movement and choreography with a strong emphasis on creating physical characters.

ABOUT SURGE 2012 //

For the full SURGE programme view the PDF here or see the Conflux website.

18+
Please enter through Argyle Street entrance